The Rabbi and The Shrink

#55: April Shprintz - Winning Through Generosity

March 31, 2022 Rabbi Yonason Goldson and Dr. Margarita Gurri, CSP Episode 55
The Rabbi and The Shrink
#55: April Shprintz - Winning Through Generosity
Show Notes Transcript

#55 Winning through generosity w/ April Shprintz

How do you make the leap from damage control to prevention?

What question should leaders be asking themselves?

What is the ROI of generosity?

These and other transformational questions are addressed when generosity guru April Shprintz joins The Rabbi and the Shrink.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/aprilshprintz/

https://drivenoutcomes.com/


1:30 What are magic blue rocks?

We don’t always recognize how we can inspire others

Mindset makes all the difference

The power of authentic storytelling


6:30 The belief that life can be different

We can feel shame for circumstances beyond our control

When generosity becomes a reflex, it means nothing to us but everything to others

We don’t see what grows from the seeds we sow

In order to serve others, we have to see the bigger picture


14:15 Things in life happen for you, not to you

Working on how you view the world is the best thing you can do for yourself

What’s with the leopard print?

Dressing your truth

The sages’ lesson from the animal world


21:00  The ROI of generosity

Pour into your people, your clients, and your community

Symbiosis survives and thrives

When leaders don’t recognize their own resources

What are The 5 Questions?


27:00  Leaders need to ask themselves:  is your culture healthy?

The consultant as a member of the pit crew

How do you define “leader”?

Generosity should be a no-brainer

People who guard their “secret sauce” may have little that’s actually worth guarding

We’re in business to make ourselves obsolete


32:00 Is generosity a hard-sell?

When people are ready, then it becomes easy to show them the solution

Make the leap from damage control to prevention

You don’t have time?  You don’t have time not to!

Firemen are sexier than building inspectors


36:00 The word of the day:  Effluence

the action or process of flowing out; efflux.

something that flows out; emanation.

Effluence is close to affluence -- when we pour into others, we serve ourselves as well



Margarita Gurri:

Welcome to the Rabbi and the Shrink. This is Dr. Margarita Gurri, Dr. Red Shoe the shrink. And this is my favorite Rabbi

Yonason Goldson:

Yonason Goldson.

Margarita Gurri:

And the good rabbi and I are delighted we have here with us, April Shprintz, did I get it right?

April Shprintz:

You did great job.

Margarita Gurri:

I get one point. April is here because she has created a whole tribe, a whole movement really about generosity in the workplace, a culture of generosity. She comes by it with a very interesting story, which we're going to ask her to share. She's got her master's in business. She's been certified as a hypnotist. So if you're feeling good, you got to know that she's not tricking you. She's very authentic. Neuro Linguistic Programming, you should know she knows about communication. And my favorite thing that she has a she's a veteran. She's proud to have been in the Air Force. Welcome.

April Shprintz:

Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here.

Margarita Gurri:

Well, the good Rabbi found you. You've got so much to share with us. We've got Magic Blue Rocks. I want to just start off there. I know, I know. We're skipping a bunch of steps. You do all sorts of things with corporate groups. You're a speaker, you're an author, and your book Magic Blue Rocks. I'm about halfway through it. Everyone must buy it. It's an audio. I'm listening to an odd audible, and my granddaughter was listening to me to it. She said, Could you rewind, I missed that part. Oh, she wanted to meet Brad, by the way, my grandchild. Oh, I love this. I love wants to meet Brad. So anyway, so please tell us what is the history of Magic Blue Rocks.

Unknown:

So it is a really interesting thing that happened, it came about in 2021 of the things that I was doing is putting together some videos about where the generosity culture came from. So I went back to my hometown, and I happened to do a video in front of the house that I grew up in. And it's really interesting, because this house is actually where I found and made those Magic Blue Rocks out of the gravel in the driveway. And so I just took a quick video on my iPhone, like, Hey, this is the house where I grew up. And you know, lots of folks come from really humble beginnings, and I am one of those. But when you grew up that way, sometimes you don't understand how it might be perceived by another person or how it might move them. And I happen to post that video. And when I did, I got literally hundreds of messages from people who said, Oh my goodness, I've I've not seen from people who came from a place like I did, that you can have what you want, and you can be successful. And I just It means so much to me. And one of the people who saw it is a gentleman by the name of Carrie Daigo he's one of the folks I dedicate the book too. And he is a very well known boxing promoter. He does a lot of amazing work. And I looked him up, did you Okay, he's been in the industry for years and years. He's also very big in the in the direct selling organization. I think he's been doing that for 30 years. But he trained under the greats, and has done a lot with with boxing, he and one of his folks is doing a movie right now with Sylvester Stallone. So big things. And he said, You need to tell that story. People need to hear that and get the inspiration from it that they too can do that. And I had never looked at it that way. But it was one of those moments that I was afraid to put my story out there. But at the same time, so intensely motivated to do it. And I sat down and wrote that book in a week. Now, there was still time editing it and making it better my publisher, thank goodness, you know, did those things to make it a better thing, but sharing that the things that I did well, the things that I did really badly. But those lessons that I learned became really important. And the book is just a year old now. And what's funny is I didn't realize it when I put it out into the world doctor, but it is really a book about mindset. And in each chapter, you can see these mindset lessons that I learned at such a young age that I'm still sharing with people today.

Margarita Gurri:

And your subtitle, those secrets of doing anything that has been certainly a theme. What I admire most about that is that you've just been authentic. And and by sharing what you've learned and what you've experienced. It's amazing. Rabbi, you have a comment, I could see it in your face.

Yonason Goldson:

Well, no comment that we've made before and many people know already is this the power of storytelling. What's what's really challenging is sometimes people tell stories, and it's all about them. And we don't really connect so much that to be able to tell a story about me and make it about you. That's what really taps into the power of story. And and, you know, I think that has a lot to do with what's so compelling about you. And your message April is that you're able to take your personal story, and universalize it in a way that people that reaction that you got, what your story did for me how your story became my story. That's the way that we bond with each other. That's how we create a sense of community and common experience. And it's, you know, and the truth is, we all have our stories. You know, there's always, some people say, I have nothing to tell. But anything that's meaningful to me, I can find the universal theme and that and I can use it to let other people into who I am. And let them find the inspiration that's in that story and how it applies to them.

Margarita Gurri:

So April, the the good rabbi is always talking about how the one thing he and I ask people to do is think. And they don't like that. No, thank you, or no, please, those my children used to say no, please. I think April, you have shown everyone that if you take the time, to live in your own truth, and really think that you can not only change the world, I do believe magically rocks will be an iconic star. For years and years and years for generations. The very well told, it's a beautiful story. It's a story about sweetness, generosity, truths, disappointment, all sorts of stuff. You tell it so very well. Please explain to us though, what is the power of a Magic Blue Rock? Because they haven't read it like.

Unknown:

So it's funny. It's one of those titles where you're like, I have no idea what that means the book is about. But for me, the Magic Blue Rock was really the belief that life could be different. And how could I do that. And long before I knew who Zig Ziglar was, I was gonna get everything I wanted by helping other people get what they want. So I found out when I was six years old, by a wonderful friend by the name of Brad that I was poor. And if you can think back to when you were a child, there are some of these big realizations that you have whatever they are, that are just monumental, and they are so huge for you. And that was for me, because even though Brad shared this with me, and actually a very kind way very matter of fact, he was very smart kid grew up to be a very smart adult, but very smart kid.

Margarita Gurri:

Are you still know him?

Unknown:

I do. It's funny. We're not in contact practice. No, he's in the book. I felt like I should tell him. We are connected. Like I couldn't get ahold of him if I needed to. But I've never told him about it. And I really should, I should be like, Brad, you're famous. And there are people who want to meet you

Margarita Gurri:

want an interview with the two of you for sure.

Unknown:

And you know, I Brian's probably gonna go, I don't even remember what

Margarita Gurri:

she saw me is invited to the rabbi in the shrink with you. I love it absolutely.

Unknown:

Have a good memory, though, because he was always so smart. But so he shared this with me. And for whatever reason, I always find it interesting. When I think back into my sexual brain, I really felt that that this was for me to solve. I felt shamed for being poor. I felt like it was a bad thing. It was something I needed to fix. And I also felt like I was in it alone. I felt like if I was raised by a single mother, and she was a waitress, and I felt like if she knew how to make us not be poor, then we wouldn't be. So I felt like I needed to fix it on my own. And I decided and this didn't make it in the book, because the publisher said it was too old of a reference. But all of my powerful business people role models at that point came from television. My favorite one was George Jefferson, who, um, dry cleaners from the the Jeffersons, right, and I wanted to move on up. And so I thought, I need to start a business and I thought, well, I could sell something. So I'm going around the house trying to find something to sell. And there's nothing that I want to part with, that I think anybody would want to buy. So randomly pick up a blue marker, put it in my pocket, and I go outside thinking, what am I going to sell? And I look at the gravel driveway, and I look at the driveway, and I'm like, can make those rocks blue. They look better. You know, if I need the magic, which to be fair, I believed I could do because it six adults were always telling me oh, you can't do that. And then I'd go do it. And I was like, well, obviously if I believe I can do it. The belief is the difference because you don't think I can but I can and I thought I can magically put the belief in the rocks. I can sell them to people and they can do everything they believe they can. And that is where the magic lies. came from,

Margarita Gurri:

I think it's lovely, and they are magic. Look at the magic that you're, you're helping inspire all around the world.

Unknown:

pretty phenomenal. It's so fun.

Yonason Goldson:

There's so we're gonna have five different episodes just just on that last summary. But you know, the one thing that really jumped out at me is that he talked about Brad. And you You said he probably doesn't even remember. Right. And there's a good chance he doesn't. You know, I've had, you know, as a rabbi, as a teacher, I've had frequent exchanges were or people said, oh, that what you said to me around, that was just so much I needed to hear. I didn't remember the conversation. Right? You did something. Thank you so much. You're welcome. I know recollection, because it fits so much into your theme of generosity, that when generosity becomes a reflex, when becomes part of who we are, we don't think of it as something extraordinary. It's just, that's it. That's how people, that's how people have this, we'll be able to show that. But the person on the receiving end, it means everything. Yes. And so, you know, we talked about this, we got to the next world. And we're going to be showing all of these wonderful things we did for the people that were not even what Oh, it wasn't, it wasn't a conscious act. But we when you create when you make yourself into a certain kind of person, then you end up sowing seeds of kindness, of generosity of goodness, where you go, and you may not be around to see what grows up out of those seeds. But

Margarita Gurri:

my mother always said, Rabbi, I, it pays to behave. Because you never know, not to behave. And I think Rabbi, You know, that's what you're talking about that you just being you ended up making impact? And I think so I have, you know, the million dollar question, I know you've helped generate a billion dollars for your clients. But how many rocks that you sell in widget charged for that I just got to know.

Unknown:

So I sold I rocks to every every child, I sold over $5 worth of rocks, and I priced them at a quarter Wow, my pricing strategy needed a little work because it was based on quarters when my favorite change for quarters added up to $1 fast. And at that point in my business career, I felt that what made you rich was the money adding up fast. So but the pricing strategy was flawed, because most kids got $1 for lunch back then. And lunch was only 80 cents. So if I priced them at 20 cents, that business could have gone on forever. But I didn't. And because I didn't, children ended up buying the rocks before lunchtime, charging their lunch. And when an entire class charge their lunch, of course, you know that the lady in the lunchroom talk to my teacher, and the jig was up. Jayco

Margarita Gurri:

and an entrepreneur was born.

Unknown:

To fail fast, I failed in a day.

Margarita Gurri:

Well, but you it was a very valuable failure. And I think it was a success. Actually, it was a limited run success. Right? You learned a lot.

Yonason Goldson:

It also ties in very much with with our theme of ethics that you wanted to serve, you wanted to make money. And of course, now we understand maybe better than you did then that we make money by serving others. And in order to serve others, we have to understand other circumstances. Mm hmm. And so 25 cents might have been perfectly fair for what you were offering. But you didn't have the capacity, I can't really blame you at age six, for not recognizing the economics, the situation to see that bigger picture in a way that you could have been more successful for yourself and in a way that served others.

Margarita Gurri:

So what's the secret? You've helped generate over a billion dollars business for your clients? And I know you've got lots of secrets. Please do share your wisdom because we all want to hear it.

Unknown:

You know, the interesting thing is if you'd asked me that question, Doctor two years ago, I would have said that the secret is, is to believe it yourself. And that's part of it. But I think I have a more holistic answer as my business evolves, and I learned more 100% I would say that it is mindset. And that includes the mindset of generosity that includes asking how I can help that includes seeing things in life as happening for you instead of happening to you and It is the biggest and most time intensive investment I've ever made in my life. And it is the highest ROI of anything I've ever done whether it's personally, professionally monetarily, it doesn't matter. Working on the way that you view the world is the most powerful thing you can do as a business and as an individual,

Margarita Gurri:

and a big ROI or return on your investment. You certainly are getting a return for yourself and others. Rabbi, You had noticed something interesting about our guests.

Yonason Goldson:

But you you prompted me there doctor. This I'm pretty sure is a first in the history of our podcast. So drumroll please. I don't believe I have ever commented on a woman's attire, which I really do. Except to tell my wife How lovely she looks. But, um, our listeners can't see. But our viewers, can they appreciate that you're wearing leopard print, Brown.

Margarita Gurri:

And in her website, she has leopard shoes.

Yonason Goldson:

Yes, I've seen that I've seen that elsewhere. And so I asked you earlier if there was more to the story than just a, a fashion preference.

Unknown:

You know, there really is. And it's it's about that authenticity, and about being who you really are. And one of the things that I realized just as I was on the planet longer is that I was always trying to conform and be what I thought others expected of me. When I was in the military, that was easy. There's a uniform, there's regulations, you can do what you need to do. When I went into the corporate world, I would dress very severely and in black suits, and try and put my hair up and come across as much more serious than I am because I wanted to be taken seriously. And I wanted to be seen as capable. And I what I didn't want to be seen as something I was told often when I was young as you are too much like too driven to bossy two to two. And I thought that was a bad thing. And what I found was really interesting is I loved animal print, and I loved red and certain things that I had in my closet that I would save to wear. And this this saddens me when I think about it, I would save to wear when I proven myself. So April, when you become the top salesperson in this organization, you can be yourself. And what a weird thing to say, now you're allowed to be you. But that's exactly how I operated. And I ran across something about five years ago by a lady by the name of Carol Tuttle. And it's called dressing your truth. And she does it for women. And she does it for men. And basically, it's just aligning the way you dress with who you really are. And one of the things with the type that I am is that it's fast moving and forceful and assertive. And animal print is like that and reflect that. And what's interesting is while you would think oh gosh, she's wearing animal print, and that will make her even more too much. It's like it almost socializes people to the idea that something is coming.

Margarita Gurri:

Something good their way comes

Yonason Goldson:

really powerful. And you know, you just reminded me that when when I gave my TED talk, so the organizers had hired a fashion consultant. And, you know, when I asked her how I looked, you know, you look like you look like you.

Margarita Gurri:

Look, you look like a robot and he always looks very rebellious. So it's

Yonason Goldson:

the reason I was really intrigued by the leopard print is because the sages have a teaching, they say Be bold, as a leopard, strong as a lion. Light is an eagle and swift as a deer to do the will of your Father in heaven. And you mentioned, the way we look at the world has so much to do with our individual success. And what the sages are telling us is look around you look at nature, look at look at others look at creation. And you see the leopard is not embarrassed, by the way it looks. It's exactly what you just described. Yeah, it's, you know, it's I love it. We live in an age where authenticity has become a cliche. You know, they say, once you can fake being authentic, you can get away with anything. But what it really means what it should mean. And what we should remind ourselves that means is is to let our true selves, our best selves, our best true selves, Project outward, because that's the source of our strength. And that's what's going to connect us with other people and I think you're living that

Margarita Gurri:

you are, and my mother would have laughed and she would have said I Mita she she thinks she's blending without ugly suit.

Unknown:

Yes, that's exactly because

Margarita Gurri:

there's nothing that sticks out more like in Birdcage, when one of the husbands was trying to pretend to be straight, and he stuck out more trying to be straight than in drag, right? Because he was not living is true. And I think that my mother was to Ibotta, Sita, like poor thing. We need to tell her go, do you? Because you're not blending? And you need to be and can you imagine how much faster you would have made your sales goal? Had you been dressing as your powerful self?

Unknown:

Absolutely, how much easier everything would have been. But I get the lessons you have. Or at least I had to you guys who are listening, listen to this and learn it the easy way because I like to do things the hard way. And that was fun for me.

Margarita Gurri:

I think you make it easier for people, but I still think our authentic truths are hard. So I know the secret to making a billion dollars isn't leopard. So what how do you instruct your corporate clients into using a generosity, culture or even adapting to one? What do you how do you teach that.

Unknown:

So it's really a principle that people either gravitate towards or they run from. And that's a great thing. Because anything that's polarizing like that the people who are for you people, you can really help, they almost run towards you, which is fantastic. And the principles of the generosity culture. What's interesting is they sound good, right? Most people think alike sound good. In theory, they sound like the right thing to do. What's amazing is company after company has proven, it is the most financially beneficial thing to do as well. And those principles are very easy they are to pour into your people, your clients and your community. And it's in that order for a reason. Because if you as a leader pour into your people, they do as you do not, as you say, so then they will pour into your clients, they will pour into their families, they will pour into their teammates. And then as you go and pour into your clients, that means that when there's conflict, or there's an issue or something about your product or service that isn't working for them, your people will step into that and find out what that is. And when they do. It's interesting, it's your clients that are having the issues that are having the problems and willing to speak up because they actually care, they're going to help you either improve what you're doing immensely, or develop an entirely new line of business. And oh, by the way, they're going to make it easier for you to prospect because they're going to start to tell people how fantastic you are. And then lastly only because it is part of this symbiotic relationship, pouring into the community gives all of those people in your organization who might be coming there because it's a job. You want it to be their dream and their purpose. Like ideally, everyone will be living their purpose in their in their role, but they're not all. So can you give them something bigger than your company bigger than themselves that they're contributing to, that not only makes them 13 times more likely to look forward to coming into work and to be pulled there, instead of pushed there by a half, two, but also create this amazing symbiotic relationship between the world you're serving and doing business in and your business hat. I mean, how amazing is that? That's how we're meant to be there's a reason that circles are so prevalent, whether it be you know, in our history or in the animal kingdom, it's because anything symbiotic succeeds, and also exists far longer than anything else.

Yonason Goldson:

Do you have a wonderful story about going into a company and recognizing a woman there? We've been there, I think for two years, and you saw something in her that her bosses hadn't. And this created tremendous transformation. Can you share that story with us?

Unknown:

Absolutely. So in this particular situation, she was an accounting clerk. And I go in and I do the thing that most leaders say they don't have time to do, which is I sit down and talk to all the people. Because when I pour into them when I listened to them, I learned everything I need to know about the particular industry. And I also learned everything that's going really well. And everything that needs to be improved in the company that time is so incredibly well spent. And with this particular individual, it's speaking with her she actually knew more than the owner about the way that the business ran, right. She knew where the bodies were buried. She knew all of the logistical things about how we take care of these particular clients and customers and she was incredibly underutilized. And she had accepted that role because at the time she needed a job she was overqualified back then, and no one had revisited it. So one of the things that I asked What we love about what I do when I go into companies is I have carte blanche, usually with, you know, obviously discussion with the the CEO, the owner, the executive team to hire and fire and promote. And the best part of that is the promoting, because she deserved to be in a role for leadership. And so we made that effective immediately. And what's so crazy is that company then grew another 50%, year over year, and this was a company that had not been doing exceptionally well, they hadn't been growing as much as they should have been in the industry. And that one move could easily be attributed to so many dollars in the bottom line. And just by pouring into her sitting and asking us the same five questions every time. And actually, if you go on my website, I have free resources, and one of them is the five questions so that you can take that time and talk to your employees, because what you find out in those conversations is invaluable. It's, you know, we have the was it MasterCard that had this cost this this cost this this is priceless. Those conversations are priceless.

Margarita Gurri:

They are people come to the rabbi in us, you know you as well for business problems. And one of the biggest problems I've seen with the COVID is that as organizations have been stressed by workforce changes, supply chain delays, people staying home to work and not wanting to come back. Lots of changes. I think many of them have left some of their core values and have started to neglect their internal clients, their internal customers, their people, which is your number one and focused on the clients. Tell us please what are the signs? If we've got leaders out there or employees that what are the signs that the people aren't being put first? What to look for?

Unknown:

So when you say what are the signs from a leaders perspective? What are the signs that I'm not putting myself first or are we outside it?

Margarita Gurri:

Yeah, you can take it that way. Because from any perspective, what are the signs that a leader is not taking? Not putting their own employees first?

Unknown:

You know, as a leader, ask yourself one question, because if it makes you nervous, you know, you're not, do you have a good culture? Because if you start thinking how to have foosball tables, and I don't have an espresso machine, and who knows what else if it gives you anxiety, you know, because I believe at the most basic level, our leaders know if they're doing a good job or not, they are choosing to ignore it. They don't think it's important. But if that question, if somebody was going to come in tomorrow with cameras and recording devices, and talk to your people about your culture, if that makes you nervous, just like if going to your annual physical with your doctor, if that appointment makes you nervous, you already know you're not doing the right things.

Margarita Gurri:

That that is for for sure. So what is your first step, then you ask the questions. I think you get the ball rolling, you have them all were leopard, that's lovely. But they should wear red shoes. I mean, in defense,

Unknown:

they know they should wear whatever they want. How

Margarita Gurri:

old a wall writes, If we're going to be generous, yes. So then what next?

Unknown:

So it's interesting, what next actually comes from the team themselves. Because from those conversations, I will know both what a company is exceptionally good at and where they need to improve on things. And then it's really a matter of doing some traffic management, what can we impact the most quickly, because one of the things that's a little different about what I do is I do not see myself as a consultant who comes in and I want to find a way to be part of your payroll for as long as possible. I see myself as part of a racing crew for a high powered vehicle, right? I want to get the tires on there, get you optimize and get you back out there on your own because you've got this, right? And so what are the things that we can do that are going to be the most impactful and the most sustainable over time, because I am running along beside the CEO or the C suite, if you will, and helping them learn and adapt to these changes as we do them. But they can be very bespoke bespoke because they are actually coming from the teams themselves.

Yonason Goldson:

I think that so much of what we do depends upon the definition of the terms that we use. And one of the words that we use a lot and I don't think we define enough as leader or leadership. And what I hear you describing, it resonates with my understanding of leadership, which is to Take responsibility for empowering others to fulfill their positive potential. And, you know, he, first of all, I mean, it's just it's so much part of your brand that you put through five questions on your website.

Margarita Gurri:

We were both remarking how generous the website was

Yonason Goldson:

without without concern that you may be undercutting your, your own business. But

Margarita Gurri:

as if anyone could do better than she, yeah,

Yonason Goldson:

well, that's, of course, that's the difference. But the truth is, you know, Simon Sinek says this, too, he says, I shouldn't have a job. You know, just there there, there are two to naturally look at how can I help others be their best? Because it's in their best interest and my best interest? It should be a no brainer.

Unknown:

Absolutely. Well, and I think you bring up a great point where you say they could do it without you. And this is my own personal belief. But I don't think there's anything that folks cannot do on their own. I don't, might it be easier or faster with me? Sure. But I think that anytime unless someone is in a super specialized field, brain surgeon, maybe, but anytime in the professional world, someone acts as if they have a secret sauce in the garden, and they won't tell you what it is, and they won't share it with you. I feel like they're actually not that good, and they're afraid you're gonna find out.

Margarita Gurri:

I think there's a lot of insecurity, a lot of insecurity that way, you know, the rabbi know always like when an organization no longer needs us? Yes,

Unknown:

I think it's, it's a wonderful thing, because you may not be in business with them anymore. But you're still friends.

Margarita Gurri:

Yeah, changing the world,

Yonason Goldson:

the way we raise our kids, it's the way as a teacher, I don't want my kids or my students to remain dependent on me, right after they've moved on. That's not my job. My job is to make myself obsolete.

Unknown:

Well, and I think being a truly great leader is not dissimilar from King a truly great parent. It's all about how do I empower and enable you to do even better than me?

Yonason Goldson:

Thank God goes back to that spirit of generosity. Do you? Do you read it? Because we run into this problem with ethics? And and I think the same thing applies that if you say I can't afford to be ethical. And you've already addressed it, to a certain degree, that generosity is an investment in a culture in a way that pays massive dividends? Like, I'll ask you the question I've been asked, Why is it such a hard sell?

Unknown:

Well, I'll tell you, I don't think it is, in my experience, it's not a hard sell. I think on the on the whole, though, what people are encountering is that we as a society are a big fan of a painkiller, or not so much about the vitamins. Even though a vitamin might have kept us from ever needing a painkiller. But isn't it interesting? They I am ready to sign up and do the right thing. As soon as it becomes painful for me not to. And I think that's most people. And for folks that don't want to be proactive about it. There are so many other people who do. And maybe you just catch those other folks and help them when the time is right. Because it's it's an individual thing for the company and the person when they are ready. And do they want the vitamin or the painkiller? It's the same thing. The difference is just the timing.

Margarita Gurri:

Yeah, and what is so much more painful. Being a psychologist, a lot of companies wait till there's a big whoops. Some big legal ethical problem conflict. HR is twitching, something's happened. Profits are tanking. There's a reputation that's been deemed. And I find that if they really invest themselves with what you're saying, then the next time they contact me, it's proactive. And I think that's lovely. I'm always proud of companies when they can make that leap, you know? And then they can have us for keynotes instead of for emergency advisory

Unknown:

is amazing. Yes. much fun. Because then you can help so many people at one time, I'd love keynotes. And you mentioned something whereby you said, I don't have time to do this. And my answer to that, although it's lame is always the same. You don't have time not to. You know, it's like you don't have time to call your mom but you miss her when she's gone. You don't have time not to. And if people realize that it actually takes less time just like the good doctor was saying. Right. It's 15 minutes now. You can spend speaking to your employee, or it's how many days you can spend hiring their replacement because they left.

Yonason Goldson:

Yeah, and being a fireman is a lot sexier than being a building inspector. But rather,

Unknown:

but maybe we got building inspectors, those nice calendars, we could improve the way that people are looking at this,

Yonason Goldson:

or red suits, maybe,

Margarita Gurri:

I think leopard with red shoes. And I think we've got we've got the solutions and pearls. I mean, we got the solution for it all now. That's neat. Well, I think we've come to the time of the program where we ask the good Rabbi for the word of the day. But before we do that, we'll come back to you. And we'll be asking you two things. One is your final word of wisdom to share with the viewers and listeners. And the other is a question I wanted to ask about fun. I have a specific question in mind rabbi, to ask about that. All right, Rabbi, what is the word of the day inspired by April sprints?

Yonason Goldson:

Well, the word of the day is truly serendipitous and truly inspired. The word of the day is effluence, ah, effluence, which is the action or process of flowing out something that flows out and emanates. And of course, that is, April, what your whole message is about pouring into others of the sages describe different types of scholars, those who know a lot, those who are very analytical. And then there's the scholar who is like a Cartesian Well, as a spring that flows stronger and stronger. Ah, and it's, I don't think it's coincidental that affluence is fair if that effluence is very close to affluence. Because when we when we pour into those around it, it it, it comes back to us, and we all benefit together. And it's, it's, it's something that's so obvious, when we discuss it the way we are, that we need to remind ourselves, periodically, we need the lessons of the Magic Blue Rocks, we need the lessons of culture generosity, and we need to review these ideas again and again. Because then we become the type of people who contribute to a more giving more generous, more affluent society and culture.

Margarita Gurri:

Absolutely. Yeah. Because you're all about abundance. And the way you give and give I think touches many hearts, and I think melting, melting a few of them as well. Thank you. Very nice. I think that's lovely.

Yonason Goldson:

So Doctor, what's on your mind as well,

Margarita Gurri:

my my question about fun. And then we'll ask the Word of Wisdom is, what is the next fun adventure for you and cowboy? Your beautiful puppy. So right

Unknown:

shitzu 13, and a half year old shitzu chief dog officer takes it very seriously, where's the tie. So our next adventure this is funny because this is also a little bit of my words of wisdom, they meld right together is this so the next thing we're going to do is on Wednesday afternoons, I tend to take off early if I'm not with clients, and we go to the dog park. And the thing is, is that may seem like a small thing to anyone. But for cowboy, it is the most amazing thing and thrilled and you would think he'd never been before and he's never going again. It was amazing experience. Well, I My Word of Wisdom is to try and live your life with that kind of exuberance, whether you have a child in your life that you can model it after, or you have like I do cowboy, and realize that the small things really are the big things, that those are the things that are so impactful. And when you find the joy in those small things, they just get bigger and bigger and bigger, like attracts like, and you have more things to be excited about. And they are just these amazing experiences that make the day to day, as fun as you thought those big events and big achievements are going to be and if you're one of those folks who've gotten to that mountain peak and thought I thought this would feel differently. I promise you if you start to appreciate the small joys in your life, those bigger things will be what you expected them to be

Yonason Goldson:

your battery before hear that. In the 50s a rabbi went up on a jet plane for the first time and he came back and he told his rabbi Oh such an experience. I looked out the window and saw the vastness of space, I saw the curvature of the earth and the sun coming up. I felt like I was looking at the face of God. As always, I know exactly what you've what you what you mean, I feel the same thing every time I see a daisy. Love that. There. There's inspiration all around us.

Margarita Gurri:

And of course, it means Margarita in Spanish. Ah, okay. Circle. Well, all about words, isn't it?

Yonason Goldson:

So, Doctor,

Margarita Gurri:

what's a lot of fun final words of the day is, the rabbi and I are so grateful that you came to the rabbi in the string to share your words of wisdom, about your culture of generosity. And people really must buy your book, The Magic Blue Rocks, the secret of doing anything, I do believe it is the secret, at least of understanding how you can begin to do anything. If you don't feel you can do anything, right. So start somewhere. And if you go go to driven outcomes.com, she's got a website. Very generous, lots of things she's offering for free. You can connect with her for coaching and training and other services. It's lovely. My Own Words of wisdom as a psychologist for this. How could you possibly think about being generous with others, if you don't start by being generous with yourself? And I think many times people are harsh with themselves, because they're disappointed that they're not perfect. Well, no one's perfect. And that's how we learn. And I think if everyone focuses on, not their perfection, but what they can do for other people, and the gratitude for the things that are in their life now. So if we focus with gratitude and not perfection, I think we're all going to come to a place where we can deserve to wear, what makes us feel like we rock where there's a shawl and pearls, or leopard, or the good ride by always looks like an elegant robot. I've seen him even in pictures when he's hiking, you know what looks like an elegant rabbi. It's nice. That's kind of who he is. And the secret to success is to loving ourselves enough to appreciate the generosity that already exists in ourselves and others. And that's all I had to say about that. So thank you, everyone. farted.

Yonason Goldson:

I was thanking him for for joining us. It's been a real pleasure. And, again,

Unknown:

having me thank you so much. This was the highlight of my day. I hope you

Margarita Gurri:

were delighted. Well, you must come back again, please. And I know that you didn't put parts of what you wanted to in the book, because that's for book number two, right?

Unknown:

And then we're gonna keep saying,

Margarita Gurri:

a year or two or three, you'll have that next book, and we want to know, but do come back to us before then. And if we can do anything, of course to be of service to you, We would be honored any anytime any day.

Unknown:

Thank you both seem to you. Alright, in the meantime,

Margarita Gurri:

this has been the rabbi in the shrink. If you have questions, comments, suggestions, go to podcast at the rabbi and the shrink.com. And you can find us anything you need could be at the rabbi and the shrink that calm. Thank you all very well and remember to be generous.